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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
to america. >> our navy is smaller now that any time the 1917. that is unacceptable to me. this is the highest responsibility of the presence of united states, and i will not cut the military budget by a trillion dollars, a combination of the budget cut the president has. that is making our future less certain and less secure. host: what is your reaction? guest: i am surprised irani is still talking about the navy after the president made about forces and bayonets. people know and understand president obama is devoted to the security of this country, that he made the call to send in the seals to take out osama bin laden it was such a threat to our country. has made a real wa priority of eliminating the leadership of al qaeda. he has extricated as out of a choice -- for a choice in iraq that cause the problems in the real economy here at home and allies around the world. president obama has done a great job on national security and foreign affairs. mitt romney, you saw him in the debate on the topic of foreign policy. most of his ideas he was a neat, too, with respect to th
other critical infrastructure. for that, we have emergency generators. we have a navy ship that has helicopters that can move assets around the state as well. we are going to be working with local officials to identify those critical infrastructure and how we can get what is needed as quickly as possible. a couple of other things we are concerned about, as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure people can also get to work. a lot folks in jersey work in new york come in the city, and in other places where transportation may be hobbled. one of the things i mentioned is the possibility of us using federal assets, and military assets as well as taking inventory of the country that can be brought in so we can help people get to their work. governor christie also mentioned the importance of schools. the sooner we can get them back into school, the sooner they are in a routine, that helps the families. we are going to have a lot of work to do. i do not want anybody to feel that somehow this is going to be cleaned up over night. we want to make sure people have realistic expectat
overseas. >> jon: boom! >> you mentioned the navy, for example, and that we have fewer ships than we did in 1916. well, governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets. (cheers and applause). >> jon: bam! >> the biggest geopolitical threat facing america you said russia. not al qaeda, you said russia. and the 1980s are calling to ask for their foreign policy back. (laughter and applause). >> jon: well, that was a little hackie. i mean that was -- that was a it will roasty. i wouldn't (bleep) your foreign policy with margaret thatcher's (bleep), come on! hickory dickory dock, your geopolitical understanding can suck my -- (laughter) sorry. that's -- no, please don't because then i'll do it again some night. (laughter) so the president had a good night. must have felt pretty confident because he was letting his professor or y'all side shine through. especially when it came to one country. >> we've created partnerships throughout the region to deal with extremism. in somalia, in yemen, in pakistan. >> jon: what? really? (laughter) pah-kee-stahn? really? suddenly you're a guy who's desperat
some of this in the other debates. governor, you say you want a bigger military. you want a bigger navy. you don't want to cut defense spending. what i want to ask you, we're talking about financial problems in this country. where are you going to get the money? >> well, let's -- let's come back and talk about the military, but all the way -- all the way through. first of all, i'm going through, from the very beginning, we're going to cut about 5 percent of the discretionary budget excluding military. that's number one. all right? >> but can you do this without driving us deeper into debt? >> the good news is, i'll be happy to have you take a look. come on our website, you'll look at how we get to a balanced budget within eight to 10 years. we do it by getting -- by reducing spending in a whole series of programs. by the way, number one i get rid of is "obamacare. " there are a number of things that sound good but, frankly, we just can't afford them. and that one doesn't sound good, and it's not affordable, so i get rid of that one from day one; to the extent humanly possible, we get th
that will drive the asian-pacific century. our navy, our air force, there is a recognition of were the challenges are. there is a really exciting ideas and a bubbling up of initiatives. you name it. it is taking place across the realm. there is nothing like success to make people want to remain engage. we have spent a lot. we have lost all locked in some of these other places. -- we have lost a lot in some of these other places. even when we have not been fundamentally successful in the violation stage -- valuation i think that will continue in the future. >> i agree with him. adding our challenge is within -- i think our challenge is within our own society. the toxic nature of our fiscal risk and the lack of bipartisanship now, politically and economically, that is the single best thing we can do for our china policy and what we can do for our foreign policy and. we are way ahead of everyone, including china. we have the best universities. we have entrepreneurialism spirits. we have a political system. i will take us over china and others. we're all gonna be thinking about the polarization next
have emergency generators. we have a navy ship that has helicopters that can move assets around the state as well. we are going to be working with local officials to identify those critical infrastructure and how we can get what is needed as quickly as possible. a couple of other things we are concerned about, as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure people can also get to work. a lot folks in jersey work in new york come in the city, and in other places where transportation may be hobbled. one of the things i mentioned is the possibility of us using federal assets, and military assets as well as taking inventory of the country that can be brought in so we can help people get to their work. governor christie also mentioned the importance of schools. the sooner we can get them back into school, the sooner they are in a routine, that helps the families. we are going to have a lot of work to do. i do not want anybody to feel that somehow this is going to be cleaned up over night. we want to make sure people have realistic expectations. what i can promise is the federal
, which is the air force version of the navy school. i darted down the navy school, kind of an abbreviated exchange. it is okay, but they're not half of what we are. because the air force? okay, good. never mind the football game today, that's irrelevant. the whole taking off and landing on a carrier. it's a good school, but wasn't anything like ours. ours is six months long and utterly miserable. i came out of that a change to the reading. some say for the better. i lost almost all of my cockiness, quite a few tailfeathers and spent the next decade be the weapons and tactics officer at different levels. i was at khobar towers would not place blew up. two-faced member that? may not want to sit too close to me because i'm always in the wrong place at the wrong time. yeah, i was there when that place blew up. i don't think any of us were thinking about terrorism than the way thought of now. it wasn't something we were prepared to fight. my generation was geared up to fight the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter, you know, she says what's wrong with russia? i said it's not russia, it's
that will check the asian pacific century, our diplomatic corps, our business community, our navy and air force, a recognition that this is where the challenges are and there is a really exciting ferment of ideas and bubbling up of initiatives, people to people, you name it, the tape lace across the realm and there's nothing like success to make people want to remain engaged. we spent a lot and we've lost a lot in some of these other places. our investments in a shed generally have paid off remarkably, even when we have not been fundamentally successful in the evaluation stage. that is likely to continue into the future. >> a quick comment on this theme of our domestic challenges because i agree with what chris said 100% about our competitor versus the entire world. i would amend your statement a little bit. it's challenges on society and if we get our act together, the polarization, the lack of bipartisanship now. that is the single best thing we can do for china policy and what we can do for foreign policy in general. it will validator system, give us the resources we need. and if we do that,
. time to make nice, right? not so much. >> our navy is smaller now than any time since 1917, that's unacceptable to me. >> governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets. >> ouch. >> we have these things called aircraft carriers where planes land on them. and we have these ships that go under water, nuclear submarines. but, really, there was some nicety, right, mr. romney? >> the president was right to up the usage of that technology. i congratulate him on taking out osama bin laden. i want to underscore the same point that the president made. i supported his action there. i felt the same as the president did. >> i think romney is leaning obama. >> it did not last long? >> we haven't heard an agenda for the president. >> team obama knows full steam ahead. the president went on a two-day battleground blitz this week or, as he calls it -- >> our 48-hour fly around campaign marathon extravaganza. >> speaking of extravaganza, did you hear about donald trump's big, huge, mega game changing bombshell announcement of president obama? yeah, neither did we. he did come out with this -- >
enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ >>> i mentioned the navy, for example, and we have fewer ships than we did in 1916. well governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets. >> that moment from the foreign policy debate got me thinking. and it led to our question of the week. during which war did the u.s. execute its last horse cavalry charge? was it, a, the civil war? b, the spanish-american war? c, world war i? or d, world war ii? stay tuned, and we'll tell you the correct answer. go to cnn.com/fareed for more of the "gps challenge" and lots of insight and analysis. you can also follow us on twitter and facebook, also remember if you miss a show, go to itunes. you can get the audio podcast for free, or you can buy the video version. itunes.com/fareed. >>> this week's book of the week is "plutocrats," by my guest today, chrystia freeland. this book has very interesting data on inequality, it has great reporting, fun tidbits about the lives of the polutocrats and fun advice on what to do with all this. >>> now for the "the last look." take a l
, and navy air force marine corps it's about the joint force. it's about the synergy of all the service in order to meet our nations needs and that's energy and balance necessary to move forward and implement a new strategy. one of the issues i always have is when people want to do an evaluation in the army they look at brigade combat teams. how many do you have and how many t. need for the future? that is fundamental to what we do however people tend to forget many other parts about the army that are so critical to us supporting the joint force. 75% of their personal force of special operations forces is the army. we can't forget about that. we are responsive and we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond and as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provided a broad range of essential services today to combat and commanders and that includes intelligence, surveillance recognizance for off the geographical combatant commanders. would provide air and missile defense. geograp
service and for outstanding public service. user doesn't officer in the u.s. navy, the joint chiefs of staff, and chief of naval operations special intelligence unit. doctor campbell received his ba from university of california san diego, certificate in music and political philosophy from the university and soviet armenia, and his doctorate in international relations from oxford university what he was a marshall scholar. to my any of his richard solomon who is the assistant of state for for east asia and pacific affairs in 1989-1982 for president george h. w. bush. he served as president of united states institute of peace since 1993 during which time he oversaw its growth into a center of international conflict management analysis in applied programs. during his service in government doctor solomon negotiate the cambodia peace treaty, the first united nations permanent peacemaking agreement, a leading role in a dialogue commission issues between the united states and the koreans. helped establish aipac, the asia-pacific economic cooperation initiative ambiguous negotiations, japan
about army, navy, air force, marine corps, it is about the joint force. it is about the sin ergey gained from all the services in order for us, in order to meet our nation's needs, and that synergy and balance necessary to move forward and implement the new strategy. one of the issues i always have as the army chief, when people want to do an evaluation of the army, now look at brigade combat teams. how brigade combat teams you have, how many you need for the future? that's important. that's fundamental to what we do. however people tend to forget many other parts about the army that are so critical to us supporting the joint force. first, 75% of the operational force and special operations forces is army. can't forget about that. we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities. for example he we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provide add broad range of essential services today to combatant commanders, that includes intelligence, surveillance, re
is the air force version of the navy school. i'd already done the navy school, kind of abbreviated exchange. it was okay but they're not half of what we are, so -- you guys air force? good. so never mind the football game today. they -- that's irrelevant. that whole landing on a carrier thing, they can keep it. it was good school but not like ours, ours is six months long and utterly miserable. i came out of that a changed human being. some say for the better. i lost almost all of my cockiness. quite a few tail feathers, and then spent the next decade being a weapons and tactics officer at different levels in the fighter wing. i was at kobar towers when that blew up. remember that? may not want to sit too close to me. i'm in the wrong place at the wrong time. i was there when that place blew up. we hadn't really -- i don't think any of us were thinking about terrorism then the way it's thought of now. i wasn't something we were prepared to fight. my generation was geared up to fight the soviet union. i ask my teenage daughter -- she say, what wrong with russia? i said, it's not russia. it w
. and although we sometimes talk about army navy air force marine corps, it is about the joint force. it is about the synergy that is gained of all the services in order for us, nor to meet our nation's needs and the synergy and balance necessary to move forward and it limits the new strategy. one of the issues i have come when people do an evaluation of the army, look at brigade combat team, how many brigade combat team compounded when you for the future. that's important to that's fundamental to what we do. however, people tend to forget many other parts about the army that is so critical to us supporting the joint force. first, 75% of the operational forces special operations forces is army. can't forget about that. we are responsive camera to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and for the example we continue to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, and as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we provide a broad range of essential services today to combat and commanders that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissa
capacities as a regional, to as a combatant commanders. he's a vice chief of staff of the navy. he touched the military and more profound ways than many flag officers did and grout of the conversation about how this is an important ingredient to our success, but we don't really understand it that well. we as a policy community don't understand it so well. so we thought we ought to learn from this and bill agreed he would be willing to lead this effort for us and i'm very grateful. we decided that we should capture the wisdom and judgment that had been developed over the last ten years by real-life experiences. so the document that you have all received i hope is a summation of a series of interviews that the staff has conducted, and i think it's going to be very valuable, very valuable over time. several of the colleagues that are involved in this are going to be here in this panel discussion. that's going to be rear admral tom cullison, dr. ellen embrey, ambassador cameron hume and dr. connie mariano vv we are glad you are not able only to participate but share your perspective today. i t
in kind. and perhaps they sink part of the iranian navy, but perhaps they also go after those same nuclear sites that israel damaged, but perhaps did not completely destroy. who knows what would come after that? that's where the danger lies. >> another major challenge, the messy fallout from the seismic "arab awakening" that began nearly two years ago. bringing the rise of elected islamist governments in egypt and elsewhere -- and a raging civil war in syria. here, too, stark rhetoric masks murky differences. romney says he'd do more to arm syria's rebels but has not said the u.s. would do the arming. the obama white house has resisted doing so, for fear heavy weapons would end up with anti-american jihadists or terrorists. vali nasr is dean of the johns hopkins school of advanced international studies. >> the differences between the candidates at the moment do not appear very large because our response to the arab spring has been fairly consistent across both political parties. >> in afghanistan, likewise, the two candidates agree on withdrawing the remaining 68,000 combat troops by the e
no, it's the navy powers. as the maritime powers like britain used to be her today the united states. and then, there was an american geographer called saul: and he put these two ideas together and were the two great powers, the land power and the sea power come together, he called the shadow belt. in the middle east is located in one of the world great shadow belt. the interesting thing about them is that small states have the ability to shift the power from one large side to the other, simply because it depends on which side they're on or which side they decide to shift to. and in the middle east, the old part of that shot about with syria and is today. but after the fall of the soviet union, after the end of the cold war, there is another heart since the entire eastward movement of the middle east place at that time when the central asian states joined the middle east, when afghanistan went to the edge of the middle east. and so today, we had a second part inside the middle east and that is iran. those two hearts with their particular allies are causing this a growing second glob
father was a former navy captain. i had respect for the military even before i went on my embed. when you are on the embed, you rely on soldiers for your own safety. any measures to take, you are taking away from a gunman. you are aware of that when this is happening. i also know the reason i am there is that -- is as the eyes of the american public. i have always gone ahead and taking the picture. -- taken the picture. i did get kicked out of then because there were three or four americans being killed and they were brought into the magic. -- medic area. i tried to photograph that. i was basically expelled. luckily, the marines took me on and i was able to complete that embed. the other issue that came up during that was that the final days of the battle, the marines were right on the front line and they could get into a situation where they are running out of food and water. i was in a situation where i did not want to take any food and water away from the other soldiers who were there. i became a little bit of a problem -- it became a little bit of a problem for me. those are the issue
, and then there was another side, the navy powers or today, the united states. then, there was an american that they called donald fuller. if you put these two ideas together and where the two great powers, the land power in the seapower come together, we call it the [inaudible] the middle east is located in one of the worlds great ones. small states have the ability to shift the power from one large side to the other. simply because it depends on which side they are on or which side they decide to ship two. in the middle east, the old part of that shadowbox wisteria, and is today. but after the fall of the soviet union, after the end of the cold war. there was another fight. since the entire movement took place at that time when a secretary of state joined the middle east and today we have a second heart inside the middle east, and that is iran. those two hearts, with their particular allies are probably the growing second global cold war. now, the first indication that we have is the reincarnation of the second arab cold war. this, we know, we have heard about it being the conflict and proxy war between
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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